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Feeding back to community in the WATCH and INFLATE trials

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The WATCH and INFLATE trials are currently running in six Aboriginal health services (AHSs), in a clinical trial network established in 2014. Both trials examine aspects of the management of otitis media in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children. Given the lengthy time that it will take to have answers to the main research questions, it is important to feedback the interim learnings to the service and community partners.

Sites differ in the way they prefer to engage with their communities to feedback such information, and have given their ideas and requests for how they would like this to be done. Consultations and qualitative research indicate that videos, posters, presentations and written materials are all useful for dissemination and support knowledge exchange with the community.

The aim of the study is to:

- Develop a suite of resource materials providing feedback to community regarding research results and good news stories, and to educate the community regarding research and ear health
- Evaluate the usefulness and acceptability of these resources, and explore other means of feedback and knowledge exchange with the community
- Strengthen ongoing community and site engagement with ear health and related research

There will be a strong focus on the site Indigenous Research Officers leading the process and speaking from their positions of expertise to guide others working in this area.

This CRE_ICHEAR funded project is also supported by the Western Sydney University Department of General Practice.

Project Lead: Associate Professor Penelope Abbott, Western Sydney University

 

Centre of Research Excellence in Ear and Hearing Health Goals:

   

For researchers

Otitis Media (OM), sometimes known as glue ear or runny ears…

For health practitioners

Otitis Media (OM), sometimes known as glue ear or runny ears…

For families and communities

Many Indigenous children, and almost all Indigenous children living in remote communities...